Therapeutic Massage

It’s estimated that about 90 percent of disease is stress-related. Chronic stress can wreak havoc on both your physical and emotional health. While eliminating anxiety and pressure altogether in today’s fast-paced world may be easier said than done, massage can, without a doubt, help you manage your stress.

Some of the benefits of regular massage include:

  • Decreased anxiety
  • Enhanced sleep quality and reduced fatigue
  • Greater energy
  • Improved concentration
  • Increased circulation
  • Lowered blood pressure

Massage is an optimal facet of self-care, but did you know it can also support integration of body and mind? By producing a meditative state, or helping you to be more in the present moment, massage can provide emotional and spiritual balance – bringing you true relaxation and peace.

Your massage session is completely yours, because your body and needs are unique to you.

Every massage session with me integrates deep tissue work, relaxing strokes, and gentle stretching to meet your stress management and pain relief goals. Aromatherapy (by request), hot towels, and guided meditation may also be added to complement the massage techniques in your session – and at no additional cost.

Pricing

Therapeutic Massage
60 minutes: $90
90 minutes: $130

Hot Stone Massage
(90 minutes only)
$150

Save with Packages!

60 Minute Packages
5 Sessions: $400
10 Sessions: $750

90 Minute Packages
5 Sessions: $600
10 Sessions: $1,150

Frequently Asked Questions

Do you have a question that you don’t see below? Let me know!

Why should I get a massage?
Ask anyone and they’ll tell you, a little indulgence now and then in something luxurious feels so good. Massage is something many lump into that category of luxury items, but unlike a lot of things we indulge in, massage is actually good for you. Research* has specifically shown that:

  • Massage can reduce sports-related soreness and improve circulation—good to know when you may be exercising more to reduce stress.
  • Deep-tissue massage is effective in treating back pain.
  • Fibromyalgia patients receiving massage have less pain, depression, anxiety, stiffness, fatigue, and problematic sleep.
  • Massage reduces symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome.
  • Oncology patients show less pain, fatigue, nausea, anxiety, and depression following massage therapy.
  • Stroke patients show less anxiety and lower blood pressure with massage therapy.
  • Massage therapy is effective in reducing postsurgical pain.
  • Alzheimer’s patients exhibit reduced pacing, irritability, and restlessness after neck and shoulder massage.

Those with existing health conditions can especially benefit from massage. By proactively caring for your health through massage, you may help reduce costly doctor visits and use of prescription and over-the-counter medications.

Overall, massage therapy may:

  • Boost the immune system.
  • Reduce anxiety.
  • Reduce the flow of stress hormones.
  • Improve sleep.
  • Improve energy levels and reduces fatigue.
  • Improve concentration.
  • Increase circulation.
  • Improve self-esteem.
  • Reduce the frequency of headaches.
  • Release endorphins.

 

*Source: Associated Bodywork and Massage Professionals

What should I expect at my massage session?
Before your appointment, I’ll have a brief intake form for you to fill out. You can fill out the intake form when you arrive at the wellness center, or beforehand at home. (I recommend beforehand.) We’ll talk about why you’re coming in for a massage and what you your goals are for the session. Are you having pain? Do you need to relax?

I’ll show you the massage room and walk you through the massage process. Then I’ll leave the room so you may undress, get on the massage table, and get comfortable under the draping sheet and blanket.

Most massage techniques are traditionally performed with the client unclothed; however, what you wear it is entirely up to you. Simply put: bottom undergarment can be left on or taken off. You will be properly draped throughout the massage.

Depending on the issues we’re planning to address, I may start the massage on your face, neck and shoulders, or maybe on your back. I use a light, unscented massage oil or lotion to allow your muscles to be massaged without causing excessive friction to the skin. Scented essential oils will never be used without prior permission or request.

During the massage

It’s great if you can let your body relax and sink into the table. If I need to move your arms or legs, etc., I’ll do the work! This takes practice.

It’s really important for you to tell me if any massage techniques I use cause pain. Pain is not okay. There may however be a certain level of discomfort and ‘good ache’ if we’re working on a problem area. It’s important that you tell me about that, too, so we can tailor the massage to be most effective without causing injury.

I’ll check in with you as we go, but please speak up if you become too warm or too cool, if you are not comfortable on the table, or need another pillow, or if you just hate the music!

After the massage

You should expect to feel mellow and relaxed after your massage. If we addressed pain issues, you may immediately feel a reduction in pain, or it may take a day or two before you feel that relief. If you are ever very sore following a massage, (it’s rare, but it can happen) please call me so we can discuss the best course of action, and so that I can make notes to adjust your next massage.

I hope you enjoy your massage! Call or email me anytime to schedule your next session.

Do I need to get undressed?
Short answer:

No. Absolutely not.

Long answer:

I’ve found many massage therapists and bodyworkers say, “Undress to your level of comfort.” I think that’s way too vague. And people new to massage have no idea what that means. Heck, I’m not even sure what that means most of the time. Here’s what you need to know about clothing during a session:

First, no matter what, you’ll always be covered (draped) with a sheet and a blanket. You’ll never be left feeling exposed or chilly. When I work on an arm, I fold the sheet back and tuck it under your arm so it’s secure. (No drafts, my friends.) I follow the same protocol for the leg.

When I work on the full back, I fold the drape down at the hips. If you’re wearing underwear I’ll gently tuck the sheet around the waistband, to protect your clothes from massage oil. If you’re wearing a bra, I’ll work around it. If you’re wearing a tank top or shorts or long johns, I’ll work through it. I know plenty of very effective massage techniques that can be administered over clothing. If I feel I can’t effectively treat your issue through the clothing you’ve chosen to wear, I’ll tell you, and we’ll figure out another approach.

Please know that I don’t care, and I’m not judging you. This massage is about you and it’s important that you feel comfortable. For some people that means leaving some clothing on. For others, it means taking it all off. There is no right or wrong, this is your massage.

Enjoy your next massage!

Should I cancel my massage if I’m sick?
Short answer: Yes, please.

Long Answer: Yes, please!

Massage is great. You know this. But it’s not always a great idea.

Whether we are in the midst of cold and flu season or not, it’s important that you know when it may be necessary to cancel your appointment.

Why?

When you are sick, your body needs rest. It’s strange to think about it this way, but receiving massage is an active task, it is not entirely rest. Massage causes change in the body, and your body has to work to maintain stability. Getting a massage when you are sick takes attention away from infection-fighting. That’s no good.

You’re not going to be cozy on the massage table.  Sure, it sounds like a warm, squishy massage table would be great. But the moment you put your already-stuffy head into that face cradle, you’ll realize the error of your ways. Gravity and pressure are not your friend here. Even if I do a great face massage to drain your sinuses, you’ll likely feel worse when you get off the table.

You could get me sick. Since most of the common plagues viruses are contagious even before symptoms show up, I could pass the cooties along to more clients before I even know it’s happening.

Further, when I get sick, I have to cancel clients and take a few days off work. I work for myself, with no paid sick days to compensate for lost wages. Sure, as a responsible business owner I have a fund for these situations. But I would rather use that fund for a vacation to the Outer Banks, NC, or a fancy new oil holster. So I’m gonna aim to stay germ-free.

So it’s a deal. You’ll cancel so as not to infect me and my massage room, and I’ll do the same for you. We’ll keep each other safe.

When to cancel

  • If you’ve had nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea in the past 24 hours, or are still feeling punky from a recent bout of such things.
  • If you’ve had a fever in the past 24 hours, or fever-related symptoms. This includes chills, aches, and fatigue. Even if you’re keeping the fever down with medicine, you’re still sick. The fever counts.
  • If you are itchy, runny, and/or sneezy, and you’re not 100% certain it’s seasonal allergies. (And even then, allergies may leave you so miserable that the hour on my table would be wasted time and money for you.)
  • If you are coughing constantly, or just a lot.
  • If someone in your household is ill and you are feeling at all funky, please cancel.

There is often some gray area here, especially if you are in the recovery phase of a virus or bacterial infection. If you’re unsure about your situation, please call me before your appointment and we can make a decision together. My cancellation policy requires 24 hours notice, but I can and will be reasonable and make exceptions in cases like this.